That’s What Friends Are For

So there I was, bottling my beer in my kitchen thinking,”Finally this is happening.” I hadn’t brewed beer in over 8 months. I felt like I was going to forget the basics; but just like a bike, I got back into it perfectly. Well, almost perfectly. I went to cap my first bottle and my capper broke apart. I was upset and started worrying about how I was going to save all of my beers without dumping my beer into a keg. I texted a couple of friends to see if they had a bottle capper I could borrow. One was able to help.

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Tasting Your Homebrew

It was a lazy Friday night and all I wanted to do was watch some TV and drink some good beers before I went to bed. I’d had a crazy week at work and this sounded perfect. I grabbed a bottle of my Rye Can’t We Be Friends out of the fridge and cracked it open. It had a nice carbonated sound to it, considering it was just barely two weeks since I bottled it. I poured it out into a glass and watched the colors change. I love that reddish-copper color. Since it’s still young, I didn’t get much of a head on the top. I took a whiff and appreciated the dry-hopping I did with the Centennials. It wasn’t an overpowering hop aroma, but it was enough to get you curious. The taste was delicious. I got a shot of citrus hops at the front and a blend of spicy and bready rye flavors at the end. I shared a taste with my friend and he agreed. Tasty! I noted to him that the beer was just short of 3% alcohol. Now that’s a friendly, tasty beer.

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“Rye Can’t We Be Friends” Extract Recipe


Ingredients:
• 1 lb German Rye Malt
• 1 lb Carapils Malt (Adds body and mild sweetness)
• 1 lb Pale Ale Malt
• 3.3 lbs Light Liquid Malt Extract
• 1 oz Simcoe Hop Pellets
• 1 oz Chinook Hop Pellets
• 2 oz Centennial Whole Leaf Dried Hops
• White Labs 041 Pacific Ale Yeast
• 6 gallons of bottled spring water

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